This Day In History: 11/19/1863 - Lincoln Gettysburg Address

This Day In History: 11/19/1863 - Lincoln Gettysburg Address


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Explore what happened throughout history on November 19 in this video of This Day in History. On November 19, 1969, soccer legend Pele scored his 1,000th goal, and dedicated it to the poor children in Brazil. On November 19, 1977, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat became the first Arabic president to visit the country of Israel. In 1998, the Senate began the impeachment process for President Bill Clinton on November 19. The impeachment was due to the relationship he had with Monica Lewinsky. Most importantly, on November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln gave the Gettysburg Address. In two minutes, he defined the ideals of the country and defined the war. However, he was wrong when he said people would not long remember what he said there, and the Gettysburg Address will stay with the United States forever.


Gettysburg Address - 11-19, 1863


The Gettysburg Address is a speech by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln and is one of the most well-known speeches in United States history.[1] It was delivered by Lincoln during the American Civil War, on the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation, so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.


Interactive: Seeking Abraham Lincoln at the Gettysburg Address

Related Content

Take a look at the above interactive to see how Christopher Oakley, a former Disney animator, pored over photographs of the dedication ceremony at the Soldiers' National Battlefield, where President Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address. There are three images of note, two made by noted Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner and one by David Bacharach.

The first screen details an identification of Lincoln made by John Richter, the director of the Center for Civil War Photography. Richter used two of Gardner's stereoscopic photographs (two identical images that, when seen together through a viewer, present a 3-D  landscape) to identify a figure atop a horse as Lincoln. The right side of the second Gardner stereo view is seen in this screen Oakley was able to obtain a high-resolution scan of the left side of this photograph, seen in the second screen.

This second screen, the higher-resolution version of Gardner's second stereo view, allowed Oakley to identify what he sees as Lincoln in a different location. He used a variety of sources, including an identification of Lincoln's secretary of state, William Seward, and a Lincoln portrait captured days earlier by Gardner, as a marker for seeking Lincoln. Oakley, who believes that Gardner assigned one of his associates to capture this stereo view, identifies Gardner in the foreground.

The third screen provides one of the sources used by Oakley to place the various members of Lincoln's "Team of Rivals"—his cabinet. In 1952, Josephine Cobb of the National Archives identified Lincoln in a photo taken by David Bachrach. It was considered to be the only image of Lincoln at Gettysburg until Richter made his identification 55 years later.


This Day in History: 150th Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address

Today is the 150th anniversary of United States President Abraham Lincoln's famed Gettysburg Address, delivered on Nov. 19, 1863 at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pa.

During July 1-3, 1863, the Union and Confederate armies fought viciously in and around the quaint Pennsylvania farm town, resulting in the deaths of almost 5,000 soldiers from both sides. It is believed that untold others died later of their wounds.

The Battle of Gettysburg is credited with turning the momentum of the American Civil War toward the Union Army, ending the Confederate Army's incursion into the North. Still, it wouldn't be until April 9, 1865 that the Confederacy formally surrendered. Just five days after that date, John Wilkes Booth, a sympathizer of the Confederate cause, shot Lincoln to death during a play at Washington's Ford's Theatre.

Of fascinating interest to historians, President Lincoln wasn't even the keynote speaker at the cemetery dedication. That honor went to the famed orator Edward Everett, who preceded Lincoln's two-minute speech with an address that lasted more than two hours. Everett, former Governor of Massachusetts, former U.S. Senator from the state and former President of Harvard University, was highly sought after as a speaker. Organizers of the cemetery dedication considered it a major coup to have secured his presence and his oratory. Some historians believe President Lincoln was invited to talk because organizers felt they had no choice but to do so. The invitation extended to Lincoln asked him to give "a few appropriate remarks."

Ironically, Everett's speech is all but forgotten, while Lincoln's speech of just over 270 words&mdashthe exact number varies slightly depending on which historical copy is considered&mdashis studied around the world and is regarded as one of the great speeches of all time.

The Gettysburg Address has been quoted countless times since Lincoln's delivery, and was prominently featured in another speech of lasting prominence. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. quoted from it in his "I Have a Dream" speech of August 28, 1963. That speech, delivered just a few weeks past the centennial observation of Lincoln's speech, was given from the steps of Washington, D.C.'s Lincoln Memorial.

Lincoln in Drum Corps

According to a blog post from the Cadets, it appears that the corps is considering Aaron Copland's "Lincoln Portrait" as a segment in their 2014 competitive production. The Cadets played a selection from the piece in the corps' 1975 show (seen in the accompanying video clip), the first year the corps made it into the DCI World Championship Finals. Copland's work from 1942 utilizes narration borrowing from a number of Lincoln quotes, including the Gettysburg Address.

The Cadets' mention of narration in earlier shows leads one to speculate that we might witness a William Warfield moment in 2014. Warfield, a famed concert singer who was once married to the equally famous singer, Leontyne Price, won the "Spoken Word" 1984 Grammy for his narration of "Lincoln Portrait." He also narrated the work with multitudes of orchestras.

Adding to the celebration of the Gettysburg Address sesquicentennial, Troopers recently announced the title of their 2014 production, "A People's House." At a minimum, it is inspired by the life of Abraham Lincoln. The title reflects Lincoln's famous 1858 speech in which he proclaimed to delegates to the Illinois Republican State Convention, "A house divided against itself cannot stand."


Gettysburg Address

On November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered a short speech at the close of ceremonies dedicating the battlefield cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Honoring a request to offer a few remarks, Lincoln memorialized the Union dead and highlighted the redemptive power of their sacrifice. Placing the common soldier at the center of the struggle for equality, Lincoln reminded his listeners of the higher purpose for which blood was shed.

Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, Gettysburg. [1863, printed later]. Prints & Photographs Division

…we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg Address, November 19, 1863.

In composing the Gettysburg Address, Lincoln must have been reminded of the words of David Wills, a prominent citizen of Gettysburg charged with cleaning up after the grisly battle of July 1-3, 1863. Wills asked the president to attend the ceremony and make a “few appropriate remarks,” stating in his letter of invitation that Lincoln’s presence would:

Dedication ceremonies at the Soldiers’ National cemetery, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Alexander Gardner, photographer, Nov. 19, 1863. Civil War Glass Negatives and Related Prints. Prints & Photographs Division

…kindle anew in the breasts of the Comrades of those brave dead, who are now in the tented field or nobly meeting the foe in the field, a confidence that they who sleep in death on the Battle Field are not forgotten by those highest in Authority and they will feel that, should their fate be the same, their remains will not be uncared for.

David Wills to Abraham Lincoln, Monday, November 2, 1863. [Invitation to attend the dedication of the cemetery at Gettysburg…] Series 1. General Correspondence. 1833-1916. Abraham Lincoln Papers at the Library of Congress. Manuscript Division

Edward Everett, perhaps the most popular orator of the day, spoke for two hours at the ceremony. Yet, Everett admitted to Lincoln,“I should be glad, if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion, in two hours, as you did in two minutes.” In spite of Lincoln’s disclaimer that “the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here,” his brief speech continues to resonate in the American memory.

National Cemetery, Gettysburg, Pa. Simon & Murnane, c1913. Panoramic Photographs. Prints & Photographs Division


This Day in History 11/19: The Gettysburg Address

This two-minute speech from November 19, 1863 has been reposted ad nauseum today, but once more won’t hurt.

Thanks, Abe. We need you now more than ever.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that this nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

The “Bliss Text”, the fifth version of the Gettysburg Address, the only version signed by Lincoln himself, and considered to be the authoritative version in classrooms and texts.


On this day in history - November 19th, 1863

HATTIESBURG, MS (WDAM) - President Abraham Lincoln delivers the Gettysburg Address at the Soldiers' National Cemetery.

The Gettysburg Address has long been considered one of the hallmarks of English speech in public. Edward Everett spoke before Lincoln for two hours yet his remarks are mostly forgotten by history. Lincoln needed only ten sentences and just over two minutes to sum up the Battle of Gettysburg, the Civil War and the human condition.

President Lincoln was suffering from the early stages of a bout of smallpox when the delivered the Address. The most-agreed upon version of the Address is reproduced here.

"Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."


Lincoln Delivers Famed Gettysburg Address

On November 19, 1863, Abraham Lincoln delivered his eloquent Gettysburg Address.

In early July 1863, General Robert E. Lee’s Confederate forces plowed northward, aiming to force Union politicians to end the war. Upon reaching Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, they met the Union Army of over 93,000 soldiers against their almost 72,000. A bloody three-day fight ensued, resulting in the largest number of casualties in single battle throughout the entire war (about 23,000 killed, wounded, captured, or missing on both sides).

U.S. #1180 – This stamp was produced following the first nationwide contest inviting artists to design a U.S. stamp.

Soon after the battle, the people of Gettysburg sought a dignified and orderly way to bury the more than 7,500 soldiers’ bodies remaining on the battlefield. David Wills, a wealthy attorney, purchased the land needed for the cemetery that would be further funded by the states.

U.S. #4788 pictures an 1887 chromolithograph by Thure de Thulstrup.

On November 19, 1863, the Soldiers’ National Cemetery (later named the Gettysburg National Cemetery) held its dedication ceremony. The main speaker was Edward Everett, who held the crowd’s attention throughout his two-hour oration. Then Abraham Lincoln stood up to say “a few appropriate remarks,” as requested by the cemetery committee.

U.S. #2975tx – Cover honoring Lincoln and Gettysburg.

Soldier and lawyer E.W. Andrews was present that day, and remembered, “On this occasion [Lincoln] came out before the vast assembly, and stepped slowly to the front of the platform, with his hands clasped before him, his natural sadness of expression deepened, his head bent forward, and his eyes cast to the ground.

U.S. #304 – This portrait was based on a war-time photo of Lincoln, capturing his despondent gaze amid the turmoil.

“In this attitude he stood for a few seconds, silent, as if communing with his own thoughts and when he began to speak, and throughout his entire address, his manner indicated no consciousness of the presence of tens of thousands hanging on his lips, but rather of one who, like the prophet of old, was overmastered by some unseen spirit of the scene, and passively gave utterance to the memories, the feelings, the counsels and the prophecies with which he was inspired.

“…There was such evidence of wisdom and purity and benevolence and moral grandeur, higher and beyond the reach of ordinary men, that the great assembly listened almost awe-struck as to a voice from the divine oracle.”

Item #CNSSECOL – A Mystic-enhanced Silver Dollar commemorating the Battle of Gettysburg.

At the time, the President’s main concern was maintaining the support of the Union in the war effort. His two-minute speech captivated the crowd of about 15,000.

Lincoln reminded listeners of the nation’s past, acknowledged the present struggle to preserve the Union, and gave hope for the future. His opening, “Four score and seven years ago,” referred to the signing of the Declaration of Independence, which stated the equality of all men, and their inalienable rights. Lincoln honored the soldiers who “here gave their lives that the nation might live,” and encouraged those who remained to be “dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced.” He looked to the future when the nation would have “a new birth of freedom – and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Item #CNPR09 – Lincoln Silver Proof Dollar with excerpt from Gettysburg Address on the back.

The speech was met with silence, which Lincoln interpreted as failure. To the contrary, the audience was in awe at the words he had spoken. President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address has since become one the most famous speeches in America’s history.


The Trail

On November 19, 1863, at the dedication of a military cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, during the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln delivers one of the most memorable speeches in American history. In just 272 words, Lincoln brilliantly and movingly reminded a war-weary public why the Union had to fight, and win, the Civil War.

At the dedication, the crowd listened for two hours to Everett before Lincoln spoke. Lincoln’s address lasted just two or three minutes. The speech reflected his redefined belief that the Civil War was not just a fight to save the Union, but a struggle for freedom and equality for all, an idea Lincoln had not championed in the years leading up to the war. This was his stirring conclusion: “The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us–that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion–that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain–that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom–and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Reception of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address was initially mixed, divided strictly along partisan lines. Nevertheless, the “little speech,” as he later called it, is thought by many today to be the most eloquent articulation of the democratic vision ever written.

The Gettysburg Address

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Sadat visits Israel

In an unprecedented move for an Arab leader, Egyptian president Anwar el-Sadat travels to Jerusalem to seek a permanent peace settlement with Israel after decades of conflict. Sadat’s visit, in which he met with Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin and spoke before the Knesset (Parliament), was met with outrage in most of the Arab world.

Despite criticism from Egypt’s regional allies, Sadat continued to pursue peace with Begin, and in 1978 the two leaders met again in the United States, where they negotiated a historic agreement with President Jimmy Carter at Camp David, Maryland. The Camp David Accords, signed in September 1978, laid the groundwork for a permanent peace agreement between Egypt and Israel after three decades of hostilities. The final peace agreement–the first between Israel and one of its Arab neighbors–was signed in March 1979. The treaty ended the state of war between the two countries and provided for the establishment of full diplomatic and commercial relations.

Sadat and Begin were jointly awarded the 1978 Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts. However, Sadat’s peace efforts were not so highly acclaimed in the Arab world, and he was assassinated on October 6, 1981, by Muslim extremists in Cairo. Despite Sadat’s death, the peace process continued under Egypt’s new president, Hosni Mubarak. In 1982, Israel fulfilled the 1979 peace treaty by returning the last segment of the Sinai Peninsula to Egypt. Egyptian-Israeli peace continues today.


Today in History, November 19, 1863: Abraham Lincoln delivered Gettysburg Address

One of the two confirmed photos of President Abraham Lincoln (center, facing camera) at Gettysburg, taken about noon, just after he arrived and some three hours before his speech. (Photo: Library of Congress)

Today is Nov. 19. On this date in:

The United States and Britain signed Jay’s Treaty, which resolved some issues left over from the Revolutionary War.

President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address as he dedicated a national cemetery at the site of the Civil War battlefield of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania.

Ford Motor Co. announced it was halting production of the unpopular Edsel.

Egyptian President Anwar Sadat became the first Arab leader to visit Israel.

Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon.com, introduces the Kindle at a news conference on Monday, Nov. 19, 2007 in New York. The $399 electronic book device will allow downloads of more than 90,000 book titles, blogs, magazines and newspapers. (Photo: Mark Lennihan, AP)

In a moment that drew criticism, singer Michael Jackson briefly held his youngest child, Prince Michael II (known as Blanket), over a fourth-floor balcony rail at a Berlin hotel in front of dozens of fans waiting below. (Jackson said he’d made a “terrible mistake.”)


Watch the video: Tag 57 Geschichte 63: Joe 3. Kapitel