Catham and Lebanon Valley 4-4-0 #5 - History

Catham and Lebanon Valley 4-4-0 #5 - History


Poquoson, Virginia

Poquoson / p ə ˈ k oʊ s ən / , informally known as Bull Island, is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,150. [5] The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Poquoson with surrounding York County for statistical purposes.

Poquoson is located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the Hampton Roads metropolitan area.

Poquoson, which was formerly part of York County, became an incorporated town in 1952 and an independent city in 1975. (In Virginia, municipalities incorporated as independent cities are not part of any county.) However, the ties remain close. Over 30 years after Poquoson became a politically independent entity, some constitutional services such as the courts, sheriff and jail continue to be shared with neighboring York County.

Poquoson is one of the oldest continuously named cities in Virginia. It is also one of the few to retain a name which derived from the Native Americans who inhabited the area before colonization by the English began in the 17th century.


Contents

Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) Edit

The most restrictive definition of the Greater Boston area is the region administered by the Metropolitan Area Planning Council. [16] The MAPC is a regional planning organization created by the Massachusetts legislature to oversee transportation infrastructure and economic development concerns in the Boston area. The MAPC includes 101 cities and towns that are grouped into eight subregions. These include most of the area within the region's outer circumferential highway, I-495. In 2013, the population of the MAPC district was 3.2 million, which was 48% of the total population of Massachusetts, [17] in an area of 1,422 square miles (3,680 km 2 ), [16] of which 39% is forested and an additional 11% is water, wetland, or other open space. [18]

The eight subregions and their principal towns are: Inner Core (Boston), Minuteman (Route 2 corridor), MetroWest (Framingham), North Shore (Lynn), North Suburban (Woburn), South Shore (Route 3 corridor), SouthWest (Franklin), and Three Rivers (Norwood).

Notably excluded from the MAPC and its partner planning body, the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization, are the Merrimack Valley cities of Lowell, Lawrence, and Haverhill, much of Plymouth County, and all of Bristol County these areas have their own regional planning bodies. Bristol County is part of the Greater Boston CSA, as part of the Providence MSA.

New England City and Town Area (NECTA) Edit

Because New England's local governance model is organized around the smaller New England town unit, and has weak or non-existent county governments, the US Census Bureau organizes its urban regions in the New England around clusters of towns known as New England city and town areas (NECTAs) rather than around county borders as it does in the rest of the country. The set of towns containing the core urbanized area, along with surrounding towns with strong social and economic ties to the core area, is defined as the Boston–Cambridge–Nashua, MA–NH Metropolitan NECTA. [19] The Boston NECTA region is further subdivided into several NECTA divisions, which are listed below. The Boston, Framingham, and Peabody NECTA divisions together correspond roughly to the MAPC area. The total population of the Boston NECTA was 4,540,941 (as of 2000 [update] ).

  • Boston–Cambridge–Newton, MA NECTA Division (92 towns)
  • Framingham, MA NECTA Division (12 towns)
  • Peabody–Salem–Beverly, MA NECTA Division (4 towns)
  • Brockton–Bridgewater–Easton, MA NECTA Division (Old Colony region) (8 towns)
  • Haverhill–Newburyport–Amesbury, MA–NH NECTA Division (Merrimack Valley region) (21 towns)
  • Lawrence–Methuen–Salem, MA–NH NECTA Division (part of Merrimack Valley region) (4 towns)
  • Lowell–Billerica–Chelmsford, MA–NH NECTA Division (Northern Middlesex region) (15 towns)
  • Nashua, NH–MA NECTA Division (21 towns)
  • Taunton–Middleborough–Norton, MA NECTA Division (part of Southeastern region) (9 towns)
  • Lynn–Saugus–Marblehead, MA NECTA Division (5 towns)

Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) Edit

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850650,357
1860830,998 27.8%
1870978,346 17.7%
18801,205,439 23.2%
18901,515,684 25.7%
19001,890,122 24.7%
19102,260,762 19.6%
19202,563,123 13.4%
19302,866,567 11.8%
19402,926,650 2.1%
19503,186,970 8.9%
19603,516,435 10.3%
19703,918,092 11.4%
19803,938,585 0.5%
19904,133,895 5.0%
20004,391,344 6.2%
20104,552,402 3.7%
2019 (est.)4,873,019 7.0%
US Decennial Census

An alternative definition defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget, using counties as building blocks instead of towns, is the Boston–Cambridge–Newton, MA–NH Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is further subdivided into three metropolitan divisions. The metropolitan statistical area had a total population of approximately 4,875,390 as of 2018 [update] and is the tenth-largest in the United States. The components of the metropolitan area with their estimated 2018 populations are listed below.

    Boston–Cambridge–Newton, MA–NH Metropolitan Statistical Area (4,875,390)
      Boston, MA Metropolitan Division (2,030,772)
        , Massachusetts (705,388) , Massachusetts (518,132) , Massachusetts (807,252)
        , Massachusetts (790,638) , Massachusetts (1,614,714)
        , New Hampshire (309,176) , New Hampshire (130,090)

      Combined Statistical Area (CSA) Edit

      A wider functional metropolitan area based on commuting patterns is also defined by the Office of Management and Budget as the Boston–Worcester–Providence combined statistical area. This area consists of the metropolitan areas of Manchester, Worcester, Providence, as well as Cape Cod, in addition to greater Boston. The total population as of 2018 [update] for the extended region was estimated at 8,285,417. The following areas, along with the above MSA, are included in the combined statistical area, with their estimated 2018 populations:

        , Massachusetts (564,022) , Rhode Island (48,649) , Rhode Island (163,861) , Rhode Island (82,542) , Rhode Island (636,084) , Rhode Island (126,179)
        , Massachusetts (830,839) , Connecticut (117,027)
        , New Hampshire (415,247)
        , Massachusetts (213,413)
        , New Hampshire (151,132)
        , New Hampshire (61,022)

      Boston metropolitan area Edit

      The Census Bureau defines the following as principal cities in the Boston NECTA [19] using criteria developed for what the Office of Management and Budget calls a Core Based Statistical Area: [20]

      Largest cities and towns Edit

      Cities and towns in the Boston CSA with at least 50,000 residents:

      Rank City 2000
      population
      2010
      population
      2014
      population [21]
      % change
      (2010 to 2014)
      1 Boston 589,141 617,594 655,884 +6.20%
      2 Worcester 172,648 181,045 183,016 +1.09%
      3 Providence 173,618 178,042 179,154 +0.62%
      4 Manchester 107,006 109,565 110,448 +0.81%
      5 Lowell 105,167 106,519 109,945 +3.22%
      6 Cambridge 101,355 105,162 109,694 +4.31%
      7 New Bedford 93,768 95,072 94,845 −0.24%
      8 Brockton 94,304 93,810 94,779 +1.03%
      9 Quincy 88,025 92,271 93,397 +1.22%
      10 Lynn 89,050 90,329 92,137 +2.00%
      11 Fall River 91,938 88,857 88,712 −0.16%
      12 Newton 83,829 85,146 88,287 +3.69%
      13 Nashua 86,605 86,494 87,259 +0.88%
      14 Warwick 85,808 82,672 81,963 −0.86%
      15 Cranston 79,269 80,387 81,037 +0.81%
      16 Somerville 77,478 75,754 78,901 +4.15%
      17 Lawrence 72,043 76,377 78,197 +2.38%
      18 Pawtucket 72,958 71,148 71,499 +0.49%
      19 Framingham 66,910 68,318 70,068 +2.56%
      20 Waltham 59,226 60,632 63,014 +3.93%
      21 Haverhill 58,969 60,879 62,488 +2.64%
      22 Malden 56,340 59,450 60,859 +2.37%
      23 Brookline 57,107 58,732 59,115 +0.65%
      24 Plymouth 51,701 56,468 57,463 +1.76%
      25 Medford 55,765 56,173 57,437 +2.25%
      26 Taunton 55,976 55,874 56,544 +1.20%
      27 Weymouth 53,988 53,743 55,643 +3.54%
      28 Revere 47,283 51,755 54,157 +4.64%
      29 Peabody 48,129 51,251 52,376 +2.20%
      30 Methuen 43,789 47,255 52,044 +10.13%

      Population density Edit

      The most densely populated census tracts in the Boston CSA (2010): [23]

      Rank City or neighborhood Census tract Population Population density
      /sq mi /km 2
      1 Fenway–Kenmore 10404 5,817 110,108 285,180
      2 Fenway–Kenmore 10403 3,003 87,828 227,470
      3 Fenway–Kenmore 10408 1,426 85,137 220,500
      4 Beacon Hill 202 3,649 80,851 209,400
      5 North End 301 1,954 66,288 171,690
      6 North End 302 1,665 64,642 167,420
      7 North End 304 2,451 58,435 151,350
      8 Cambridge 3539 7,090 56,819 147,160
      9 Back Bay 10801 2,783 56,534 146,420
      10 East Boston 502 5,231 55,692 144,240

      Race and ethnicity Edit

      The 40 most diverse Census tracts in the Boston CSA: [23]

      Rank City or neighborhood Census tract Population % White % Black % Hispanic % Asian % multiracial or other
      1 Dorchester 916 3,138 12 32 15 26 14
      2 Pawtucket 161 4,607 28 24 28 1 18
      3 Pawtucket 151 4,472 24 24 29 1 23
      4 Pawtucket 164 4,938 29 26 21 2 20
      5 Dorchester 912 3,234 30 24 22 6 18
      6 Dorchester 92101 6,451 30 22 11 31 6
      7 Brockton 5115 4,308 21 32 13 2 32
      8 Brockton 511 3,040 28 33 15 1 24
      9 New Bedford 6519 1,942 26 11 33 1 29
      10 Mission Hill 80801 3,885 32 20 35 10 2
      11 Pawtucket 154 2,258 35 20 35 0 11
      12 Brockton 5114 3,716 24 36 14 2 23
      13 Brockton 5109 2,531 24 36 16 1 24
      14 Brockton 5103 3,798 23 38 15 2 24
      15 Brockton 5104 3,706 19 38 15 2 25
      16 Dorchester 90901 3,730 38 18 21 20 4
      17 Worcester 733 3,762 38 10 37 12 4
      18 Providence 26 3,098 23 22 39 10 6
      19 Malden 3415 4,780 39 23 14 19 5
      20 Cambridge 3524 2,126 27 39 16 12 5
      21 South End 71202 3,131 39 19 24 15 3
      22 Brockton 511301 5,334 39 31 11 2 17
      23 Providence 15 2,994 28 13 41 14 4
      24 South Boston 61 3,098 41 15 29 11 4
      25 Lynn 2072 2,939 30 12 42 13 2
      26 Cambridge 3549 6,058 35 30 9 20 5
      27 South Boston 61101 2,232 20 21 42 14 2
      28 Brockton 5116 7,211 42 29 10 2 16
      29 Roxbury 801 3,350 15 43 28 1 11
      30 Lowell 3114 5,986 44 11 14 26 5
      31 Brockton 5108 6,339 18 44 12 2 22
      32 Mission Hill 81001 4,890 45 14 19 19 2
      33 Malden 3418 6,554 46 20 13 16 5
      34 South Boston 607 1,893 19 20 46 10 5
      35 Brockton 5107 5,656 46 31 8 4 11
      36 Brockton 5112 4,849 47 26 11 1 13
      37 Somerville 351404 4,289 47 7 22 13 11
      38 Lynn 2071 3,513 18 11 48 19 3
      39 Framingham 383101 4,923 23 10 48 1 18
      40 Mission Hill 811 4,091 48 21 15 13 2

      The 40 census tracts in the Boston CSA with the highest percentage of residents who identify as Hispanic or Latino: [23]

      Rank City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % Hispanic or Latino
      1 Lawrence 2525 3,810 94
      2 Lawrence 2509 2,193 93
      3 Lawrence 2504 3,858 90
      4 Lawrence 2503 2,101 89
      5 Lawrence 2513 3,721 89
      6 Lawrence 2512 1,356 86
      7 Lawrence 2507 4,756 86
      8 Lawrence 251 1,782 85
      9 Chelsea 1602 4,043 83
      10 Lawrence 2506 5,599 83
      11 Lawrence 2514 5,053 77
      12 Chelsea 160101 7,551 76
      13 Lawrence 2501 2,329 75
      14 Lawrence 2516 5,977 74
      15 Lawrence 2511 2,937 73
      16 Lawrence 2502 5,524 72
      17 Chelsea 1604 2,716 71
      18 Chelsea 160501 5,604 71
      19 Providence 16 8,540 70
      20 Lawrence 2515 6,149 70
      21 Worcester 732001 3,327 67
      22 East Boston 506 2,063 67
      23 East Boston 502 5,231 66
      24 East Boston 507 4,504 65
      25 East Boston 50901 4,165 65
      26 Providence 2 6,452 64
      27 Providence 4 3,761 64
      28 Providence 14 6,693 63
      29 Providence 5 3,040 63
      30 Central Falls 11 5,534 63
      31 Lawrence 2508 6,932 63
      32 Chelsea 160502 4,460 62
      33 Methuen 2524 4,175 62
      34 Providence 17 3,744 62
      35 Providence 18 7,114 61
      36 Central Falls 111 4,176 61
      37 East Boston 50101 5,115 61
      38 Lawrence 2517 5,145 61
      39 Providence 3 7,714 60
      40 Central Falls 108 4,763 59

      Census tracts in the Boston CSA with the highest percentage of residents who identify as Black American: [23]

      Rank City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % Black
      1 Mattapan 101101 3,115 84
      2 Mattapan 101102 4,396 84
      3 Mattapan 101001 5,480 83
      4 Mattapan 1003 3,303 80
      5 Mattapan 1002 2,787 78
      6 Mattapan 101002 4,979 77
      7 Dorchester 923 2,893 77
      8 Roxbury 82 2,815 74
      9 Roxbury 817 3,820 71
      10 Hyde Park 1404 7,650 71
      11 Roxbury 901 4,571 71
      12 Dorchester 919 3,860 70
      13 Dorchester 1004 4,865 68
      14 Roxbury 819 3,115 66
      15 Roxbury 924 5,277 66
      16 Roxbury 818 2,898 65
      17 Mattapan 1001 5,510 64
      18 Roxbury 815 2,134 62
      19 Roxbury 821 5,025 62
      20 Roxbury 803 1,769 60
      21 Roxbury 903 3,179 58
      22 Dorchester 1009 4,072 58
      23 Dorchester 1005 5,909 55
      24 Hyde Park 1403 6,382 54
      25 Dorchester 92 4,945 54
      26 Roxbury 902 2,233 53
      27 Dorchester 918 3,452 52
      28 Roxbury 904 3,659 52
      29 Roxbury 814 3,003 50
      30 Roxbury 80401 2,710 50
      31 Roslindale 140106 1,901 49
      32 Dorchester 917 3,069 47
      33 Dorchester 914 2,741 46
      34 Brockton 5108 6,339 44
      35 Roxbury 805 3,096 44
      36 Roxbury 801 3,350 43
      37 Randolph 420302 7,703 42
      38 Roxbury 813 4,760 42
      39 Dorchester 922 3,349 42
      40 Randolph 420202 6,303 40

      Census tracts in the Boston CSA with the highest percentage of residents who identify as Asian American: [23]

      Rank City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % Asian
      1 South End 70402 1,723 70
      2 Chinatown 702 5,218 58
      3 Lowell 3112 3,267 55
      4 Lowell 3118 3,513 54
      5 Lowell 3117 5,098 47
      6 Quincy 417502 4,639 45
      7 Quincy 4172 8,182 44
      8 Malden 3413 5,439 39
      9 Lowell 3113 4,057 38
      10 Westborough 742402 3,026 38
      11 Quincy 417501 5,004 37
      12 Cambridge 353102 5,040 36
      13 Quincy 417802 3,150 35
      14 Lowell 3111 2,410 34
      15 Lowell 3115 2,974 33
      16 Dorchester 92101 6,451 31
      17 Quincy 417601 5,196 30
      18 Fenway–Kenmore 10103 4,569 29
      19 Quincy 4180002 7,020 28
      20 Quincy 417602 5,155 28
      21 Chinatown/Leather District/Downtown 70101 5,902 27
      22 Cambridge 3539 7,090 27
      23 Lowell 3114 5,986 26
      24 Lowell 3116 5,295 26
      25 Lowell 3107 4,441 26
      26 Quincy 4171 4,264 26
      27 Dorchester 916 3,138 26
      28 Malden 3412 6,857 25
      29 Malden 341102 4,564 25
      30 Malden 341101 3,675 25
      31 Acton 363102 5,909 25
      32 Dorchester 911 4,861 25
      33 Allston-Brighton 703 2,791 24
      34 Lexington 3583 5,526 24
      35 Quincy 418004 4,280 23
      36 Brookline 4009 3,865 22
      37 Cambridge 3532 4,897 22
      38 Cambridge 352101 1,654 22
      39 Shrewsbury 7391 9,557 22
      40 Westborough 7612 5,780 22

      Census tracts in the Boston CSA with the highest percentage of residents who identify as Irish American: [24]

      City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % Irish
      South Boston 60101 3,106 68
      Milton 416400 6,069 63
      Charlestown 040401 2,439 63
      Dorchester 1007 4,322 63
      South Boston 608 3,964 62
      South Boston 604 4,904 61
      Milton 416101 5,724 58
      Marshfield 506204 4,886 57
      Weymouth 422100 5,293 57
      Quincy 417801 5,443 55
      Hull 500101 3,702 55
      Scituate 505101 3,860 55
      West Roxbury 130402 4,637 54
      Quincy 417400 2,566 53
      South Boston 60301 3,076 52
      Abington 520100 6,458 52
      Braintree 419200 5,002 52
      Braintree 419600 6,766 52
      Abington 520201 3,952 52
      Pembroke 508200 6,031 52

      Census tracts in the Boston CSA with the highest percentage of residents who identify as Italian American: [25]

      City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % Italian
      Johnston 012402 2,486 63
      Cranston 014501 5,179 58
      Johnston 012500 5,490 57
      Johnston 012200 7,187 57
      Providence 011902 4,780 55
      Cranston 014800 5,591 55
      Saugus 208102 3,343 51
      Cranston 014300 4,716 49
      Cranston 014600 6,991 49
      Cranston 014502 4,096 48
      Johnston 012300 6,656 48
      Johnston 012401 6,950 48
      Stoneham 337102 5,042 45
      Stoneham 337202 4,849 45
      Revere 170200 4,564 45
      Revere 170502 2,818 43
      Cranston 013900 2,992 43
      Revere 170300 9,040 43
      North Providence 012103 2,965 43

      Census tracts in the Boston CSA with the highest percentage of residents who identify as Portuguese American: [26]

      City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % Portuguese
      New Bedford 652800 3,277 72
      Fall River 640600 4,450 69
      Dartmouth 653203 5,005 65
      New Bedford 652400 2,664 64
      New Bedford 652000 2,676 62
      Fall River 640500 5,165 60
      Fall River 641200 2,803 59
      New Bedford 650500 3,141 58
      Fall River 640901 5,071 58
      New Bedford 650400 3,773 57
      New Bedford 652500 2,589 56
      East Providence 010400 6,661 55
      New Bedford 652300 2,870 54
      Fall River 641000 2,419 54
      Fall River 640300 3,693 53
      Westport 646101 7,356 53
      Fall River 640700 2,900 53
      Fall River 640400 2,682 53
      New Bedford 650101 5,753 53
      Fall River 640100 5,358 52

      Census tracts in the Boston CSA with French or French Canadian listed as first ancestry: [27]

      City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % French
      Woonsocket 018500 2,831 66
      Woonsocket 017700 3,518 61
      Woonsocket 017500 3,128 59
      Woonsocket 017800 2,514 58
      Burrillville 013001 3,479 56
      North Smithfield 012802 2,391 54
      North Smithfield 012803 4,776 53
      Burrillville 013002 7,539 53
      North Smithfield 012801 4,800 52
      Manchester 002300 3,758 52
      Woonsocket 017900 3,049 51
      Burrillville 012900 4,937 50
      Manchester 000202 2,297 49
      Manchester 002100 4,782 49
      Woonsocket 017600 2,560 49
      Manchester 002600 5,746 48
      Manchester 002200 3,232 47
      Woonsocket 018400 6,527 47
      Blackstone 747101 5,110 47
      Woonsocket 018000 2,680 46

      Other Edit

      Greater Boston has a sizable Jewish community, estimated at between 210,000 people, [28] [29] and 261,000 [30] or 5–6% of the Greater Boston metro population, compared with about 2% for the nation as a whole. Contrary to national trends, the number of Jews in Greater Boston has been growing, fueled by the fact that 60% of children in Jewish mixed-faith families are raised Jewish, compared with roughly one in three nationally. [28]

      The City of Boston also has one of the largest LGBT populations per capita. It ranks fifth of all major cities in the country (behind San Francisco, and slightly behind Seattle, Atlanta, and Minneapolis respectively), with 12.3% of the city identifying as gay, lesbian, or bisexual. [31]

      County 2016 Estimate 2010 Census Change Area Density
      Essex County, Massachusetts 779,018 743,159 +4.83% 492.56 sq mi (1,275.7 km 2 ) 1,582/sq mi (611/km 2 )
      Middlesex County, Massachusetts 1,589,774 1,503,085 +5.77% 817.82 sq mi (2,118.1 km 2 ) 1,944/sq mi (751/km 2 )
      Norfolk County, Massachusetts 697,181 670,850 +3.93% 396.11 sq mi (1,025.9 km 2 ) 1,760/sq mi (680/km 2 )
      Plymouth County, Massachusetts 513,565 494,919 +3.77% 659.07 sq mi (1,707.0 km 2 ) 779/sq mi (301/km 2 )
      Suffolk County, Massachusetts 784,230 722,023 +8.62% 58.15 sq mi (150.6 km 2 ) 13,486/sq mi (5,207/km 2 )
      Rockingham County, New Hampshire 303,251 295,223 +2.72% 694.72 sq mi (1,799.3 km 2 ) 437/sq mi (169/km 2 )
      Strafford County, New Hampshire 127,428 123,143 +3.48% 368.97 sq mi (955.6 km 2 ) 345/sq mi (133/km 2 )
      Total 4,794,447 4,552,402 +5.32% 3,487.40 sq mi (9,032.3 km 2 ) 1,375/sq mi (531/km 2 )

      A long established center of higher education, the area includes many community colleges, two-year schools, and internationally prominent undergraduate and graduate institutions. The graduate schools include highly regarded schools of law, medicine, business, technology, international relations, public health, education, and religion. Greater Boston contains seven R1 Research Institutions as per the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. This is, by far, the highest number of such institutions in a single Metropolitan Statistical Area in the United States.

      Changes in house prices for the Greater Boston area are publicly tracked on a regular basis using the Case–Shiller index the statistic is published by Standard & Poor's and is also a component of S&P's 10-city composite index of the value of the residential real estate market.

      • Companies along, inside or outside I-495, outside Route 128:
          , in Worcester (pharmaceutical laboratory) , in Worcester (research laboratory) , in Boxborough , in Norwood , in Quincy , in Beverly , in Burlington (headquarters) , in Acton , in Boston (headquarters) , in Boston (headquarters) , in Northborough (headquarters) , in Westborough (headquarters) , in Framingham (headquarters) , in Boston (headquarters) , in Marlborough (headquarters) , in Wilmington (headquarters) , in Boxborough
      • CommunityRoot, in Boston (headquarters) , in Worcester (manufacturer of space suits) , in Marlborough (regional headquarters) , in Hopkinton (headquarters) , in Marlborough (headquarters) , in Marlborough (regional headquarters) , in Andover, Massachusetts , in Boston , in Boston (headquarters) , in Hudson , in Chelmsford, Massachusetts (headquarters) , Inc, in Framingham (headquarters) , in Natick , in Bedford (headquarters)
      • Morgan Construction Company, in Worcester (rolling steel mill technology) , in Norwood (headquarters) , headquartered in Cambridge, with locations worldwide (a Swissmultinationalpharmaceutical company based in Basel) , in Andover (regional headquarters) , in Andover (global headquarters) and Framingham , in Westford (engineering headquarters) in Taunton (factory and headquarters) , in Worcester , in Marlborough (headquarters) , in Framingham (headquarters) , in Quincy (headquarters) , in Framingham (headquarters) , in Wilmington (headquarters) , in Brockton (headquarters) , in Grafton (complex metal components and products)
        • , in Cambridge (headquarters) , in Waltham (R&D) , in Cambridge (headquarters) , in Medford (North American headquarters) , in Weston (North American headquarters) , in Peabody (North American headquarters) , in Waltham , in Canton (headquarters) , in Cambridge , in Lynn , in Waltham (headquarters) , in Cambridge , in Braintree , in Waltham, Cambridge and Littleton , in Cambridge (headquarters) , in Burlington (headquarters) , in Burlington (headquarters) , in Waltham (US headquarters) , in Westwood (headquarters) , in Cambridge , in Cambridge (Parent company of CBS and Viacom), in Dedham (headquarters) , in Waltham (US headquarters) , in Waltham
        • NetBlazr, in Watertown , in Burlington , in Cambridge (research headquarters) , in Waltham , in Burlington in Burlington in Danvers (headquarters) in Needham (headquarters) in Burlington in Bedford (headquarters) , in Waltham (headquarters) , in Canton (US headquarters) , in Cambridge (headquarters many locations in the area) , in Needham (headquarters) , in Malden (headquarters) , in North Reading (headquarters) , in Waltham (headquarters) , in Needham (headquarters) , in Cambridge , in Lexington (North American headquarters) [36]
          (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) , now owned by Procter & Gamble (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) , now the United States division of Canada's Manulife Financial (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (moving to Assembly Row, Somerville) (North American headquarters, moving to Assembly Row, Somerville) (headquarters) (headquarters)
        • Sonesta International Hotels Corp. (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters) (headquarters)
        Club Sport League Stadium Established League titles
        Boston Bruins Ice hockey National Hockey League TD Garden (Boston) 1924 6 Stanley Cups
        7 Eastern Conference Titles
        Boston Cannons Lacrosse Major League Lacrosse Harvard Stadium (Boston) 2001 1 MLL Championship
        Boston Celtics Basketball National Basketball Association TD Garden (Boston) 1946 17 NBA Championships
        21 Eastern Conference Titles
        Boston Pride Ice hockey National Women's Hockey League Bright Hockey Center (Boston) 2015 2 Isobel Cups
        Boston Red Sox Baseball Major League Baseball Fenway Park (Boston) 1901 9 MLB World Series Champions
        14 American League Pennants
        New England Patriots Football National Football League Gillette Stadium (Foxboro) 1960 6 Super Bowl Champions
        11 AFC Champions
        New England Revolution Soccer Major League Soccer Gillette Stadium (Foxboro) 1995 1 US Open Cup
        1 SuperLiga
        • The Boston Marathon, which follows a course from Hopkinton to Boston
        • The Head of the Charles Regatta
        • The Lenox Industrial Tools 301, Sylvania 300 and New Hampshire Indy 225 auto races at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway oval track.

        Interstates Edit

        U.S. Routes Edit

        State Highways Edit

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        • Route 140
        • Route 146
        • Route 213
        • Route 225

        Bridges and tunnels Edit

          , carrying Route 1A Northbound , carrying Interstate 195 , carrying Route 138 , carrying Massachusetts Route 3A , carrying Route 1A Southbound , carrying I-90 , carrying I-93 and Routes 1 and 3 concurrently , carrying Route 1 , carrying Interstate 93, Route 1 and Route 3 concurrently

        Airports Edit

          in Boston, 3 miles (4.8 km) northeast of downtown Boston, New England's largest transportation center in Manchester, New Hampshire in Warwick, Rhode Island in Bedford

        Rail and bus Edit

          (MBTA, generally known as the "T") rapid transit lines:
            heavy rail: Cambridge–Braintree and Boston (Mattapan) heavy rail: Boston (Jamaica Plain)–Malden heavy rail: Boston–Reverelight rail/streetcar: Cambridge–Brookline and Newtonstreetcar: Ashmont–Milton–Mattapanbus rapid transit South Station–Logan Airport and Downtown–Nubian
            serving Plymouth County serving northern Bristol County, western Norfolk County, Kent County, and Washington County, connecting to Providence, Rhode Island shuttle service from South Station serving western Norfolk County serving Boston's South Shore serving Boston suburbs and Needham serving southwestern Middlesex County, connecting to Worcester serving northwestern Middlesex County, connecting to Fitchburg serving northern Middlesex County and Newburyport/Rockport Line serving Essex County & Boston's North Shore

          The first railway line in the United States was in Quincy. See Neponset River.

          The following Regional Transit Authorities have bus service that connects with MBTA commuter rail stations:


          Non-native settlement in the region dates to ca. 1740. In 1754, prominent soldier and land owner Colonel Charles Broadwater settled within the town boundaries. Broadwater's son-in-law, John Hunter built the first recorded house there in 1767, naming it Ayr Hill to recall his birthplace, Ayr, Scotland. That name was then applied to the tiny developing community. The name of the town was changed in the 1850s, when a doctor, William Hendrick, settled there if the town renamed itself after his hometown, Phelps, New York, which was then known as Vienna. [6]

          On June 17, 1861 a relatively-minor but widely-noted military engagement occurred there, the Battle of Vienna, one of the earliest armed clashes of the American Civil War. A would-be Union occupation unit under Brigadier General Robert C. Schenck approached Vienna from the east by train but was ambushed and forced to retreat by a superior Confederate force led by Colonel Maxcy Gregg. Today, several historical markers in Vienna detail its Civil War history. [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] In addition, in the center of town lies the well preserved Freeman House which, in 1861, was the polling place for the secession vote and was used during the war by both sides as a hospital. The house has been turned into a museum and gift shop.

          The First Baptist Church of Vienna was founded in 1867, and the original church structure was built using Union Army barracks lumber obtained through the Freedmen's Bureau. [12] This church building was also the town's first black public school. The first white public school was built in 1872. A permanent black elementary school was built, which was later named for its long-time principal, Louise Archer. Fairfax County Schools were completely desegregated by the Fall of 1965. [13]

          Robert Hanssen was arrested in Vienna in 2001 for spying for the Russian intelligence service (and previously the KGB). His home was outside the town but had a Vienna mailing address. He used dead drops in nearby Foxstone Park to deliver U.S. federal government secrets to his handlers, and to collect cash or diamonds in exchange. Hanssen was sentenced that year to serve multiple life terms in prison.

          According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 4.4 square miles (11.5 km 2 ), all of it land. As a suburb of Washington, D.C., Vienna is a part of both the Washington Metropolitan Area and the larger Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area. It is bordered on all sides by other Washington suburbs, including: Wolf Trap to the north, Tysons Corner to the northeast, Dunn Loring to the east, Merrifield to the south, and Oakton to the west. [18] These communities are unincorporated, and portions of them lie in ZIP codes with Vienna postal addresses despite lying outside the town's borders. [19]

          Historical population
          Census Pop.
          1880136
          1900317
          1910578 82.3%
          1920773 33.7%
          1930903 16.8%
          19401,237 37.0%
          19502,029 64.0%
          196011,440 463.8%
          197017,146 49.9%
          198015,469 −9.8%
          199014,852 −4.0%
          200014,453 −2.7%
          201015,687 8.5%
          2019 (est.)16,485 [3] 5.1%
          * U.S. Decennial Census

          As of the 2010 census, there were 15,687 people, 5,528 households, and 4,215 families residing in the town. The population density was 3,565.2 per square mile (1,376.5/km 2 ). There were 5,686 housing units at an average density of 1,292.3 per square mile (494.4/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the town was 75.5% White, 12.1% Asian, 3.2% African American, 0.3% Native American, 5.3% from other races, and 3.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.0% of the population. [2]

          There were 5,528 households, out of which 39.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.4% were married couples living together, 3.7% had a male householder with no wife present, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.8% were non-families. 18.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84, and the average family size was 3.19. [2]

          In the town, the population was spread out, with 25.7% under the age of 18, 6.1% from 18 to 24, 24.7% from 25 to 44, 30.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.7 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.1 males age 18 and over. [2]

          As of 2009, the median income for a household in the town was $113,817, and the median income for a family was $124,895. Males had a median income of $88,355 versus $66,642 for females. The per capita income for the town was $49,544. About 3.7% of families and 5.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over. [20]

          Vienna's median home price was $820,000 in 2017, [21] one of the highest in the nation.

          Primary and secondary schools Edit

          Vienna is served by three high schools (Oakton, Madison, and Marshall), two middle schools (Kilmer and Thoreau), and seven elementary schools. However, of all the schools Vienna students attend, only four public and one private are actually within the town limits: Cunningham Park Elementary School, Marshall Road Elementary School, Louise Archer Elementary School, Vienna Elementary School and Green Hedges School.

          Vienna has one independent school, Green Hedges, accredited by the Virginia Association of Independent Schools. Green Hedges has students from ages 3– 5 (Montessori preschool and kindergarten program) through preparatory grades 1–8. Founded in 1942 by Frances and Kenton Kilmer, the School was relocated to the Windsor Heights area of Vienna in 1955.

          Vienna also has one independent Catholic school, Oakcrest School, which was founded in 1976 and moved to its permanent campus in Vienna in 2017, [22] and two Catholic elementary schools: St. Mark Catholic School and Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic School. [23] [24]

          The music program at James Madison High School includes a marching band, "The Pride of Vienna", and color guard, two symphonic bands, jazz band, orchestra, and chorus. The Crew team at James Madison has won many awards. [25] The novice team has won states three years in a row [25] In addition, the Women's Junior Eight of 2010 won second in the nation as well as Virginia States. [25] Their Team sent all their boats but two, to the nationals in Saratoga. [25] Their Varsity Baseball team has won 26 District titles, 6 Region titles, and 4 State titles (1968, 1971, 2002, 2015), led by Coach Mark "Pudge" Gjormand's 20-year run which produced 19 of the 36 titles (14 district, 3 region, and 2 state). A water tower stating "Home of the Warhawks" can be seen towering over the school. Also, more recently, the Madison Men's Lacrosse team, coached by coach of the year, Arron Solomon, won the District, Regional, and State championship in the spring of 2019. The 2019 lacrosse team was the first team at James Madison to win a state championship and did so without any players committed to a college team.

          Thoreau Middle School shares a class with Joyce Kilmer Middle School (also located in Vienna) and Longfellow Middle School (located in Falls Church). Kilmer had accelerated programs for students that have passed certain aptitude tests, known as the Advanced Academic Program (AAP) program. This program has also been introduced into Luther Jackson Middle School. Kilmer also has a band and orchestra program, and recently started up a Science Olympiad and Chess Club program.

          Close to Madison sit the seven elementary schools: Flint Hill Elementary (not to be confused with Flint Hill School, a private school in neighboring Oakton, Virginia), Louise Archer (which also has an AAP program), Marshall Road, Oakton Elementary (a feeder school into Oakton and Madison High Schools), [26] Vienna Elementary, Wolftrap, and Cunningham Park. Each of these schools send graduates into Thoreau, Kilmer, Luther Jackson Middle School or Longfellow, and afterwards James Madison High School, Oakton High School (just outside Vienna on the border with Oakton, with a Vienna address), George C. Marshall High School (in the Falls Church area of Fairfax County), Falls Church High School (just outside Vienna in Merrifield) or McLean High School. Freedom Hill Elementary, which recently started an Advanced Academic program, sends graduates to Kilmer, and afterward to Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology or Marshall High School. Residents of Vienna who live along the town's border with Great Falls, VA also send graduates into Langley High School via Cooper Middle School. Because of the large influx of new residents in the last decade, the classes of '09, '10, and '11 at these regional high schools are expected to be the largest over the next ten years. [ citation needed ]

          Public libraries Edit

          Fairfax County Public Library operates the Patrick Henry Library in Vienna. [27]


          Rutland Railroad's Premier Passenger Trains

          At the same the General Assembly also gave charter to the Vermont Central Railroad, organized by Charles Paine.  This line was to utilize a more northerly route through the White and Onion River valleys while passing through Northfield (his hometown). 

          These two individuals grew into bitter rivals and the railroads they built similarly remained at odds with one another for many decades. 

          During November of 1847, Follett renamed his system as the Rutland & Burlington Railroad to better reflect his intentions. 

          Over the next two years Follett worked hard in seeing the R&B brought to completion in 1849 construction picked up and was finished by the fall of that year between Bellows Falls and Burlington. 

          To capstone the project, a race was held to see whether a team of horses or a train could move the mail faster between the two cities.  The train won by a good two hours!

          Rutland RS3 #203 crosses the northern islands of Lake Champlain (South Hero, Grand Isle, and North Hero) via its marble, riprap causeway with what appears to be a milk train during the 1950s. Today, the right-of-way is the Island Line Rail Trail. Tom Stewart photo.

          Financial difficulties first began appearing in the 1860s traffic had not materialized (as Jim Shaughnessy notes in his book, "The Rutland Road: Second Edition" it was a system that connected "nowhere to nowhere") in part due to the fighting with Paine's Vermont Central which refused to offer interchange. 

          On July 9, 1867 the bankrupt R&B was reorganized the Rutland Railroad Company.  Under the direction of John Page efforts were made to gain new and permanent interchange partners:

          • The Cheshire Railroad (later Boston & Maine) was secured at Bellows Falls.
          • Cross-lake traffic at Burlington was gained via the Whitehall & Plattsburgh across the waters at Plattsburgh (this road was attempting to provide its own northerly connection into Canada).  
          • A western connection was also acquired with the Rensselaer & Saratoga at Rutland.

          During 1870 the Rutland expanded its system exponentially, gaining new western and southern outlets by leasing the Whitehall & Plattsburgh as well as the Vermont & Massachusetts (neither road was ultimately folded into its system). 

          It also picked up the small Addison Railroad giving it access to Ticonderoga, New York and grew its steamship freight business via control of the Champlain Transportation Company. 

          A nervous Vermont Central leased the Rutland on December 30, 1870 in an attempt to quell the growing competition from its biggest competitor. 

          Unfortunately, this move eventually forced the VC into bankruptcy during March of 1896 and the Rutland regained its independence on May 7th of that year.  The old adversaries may have ended their longtime feud but the Rutland continued to grow into the 20th century.

          The Rutland Railroad logo. Author's work.

          Just prior to this event was Rutland's efforts to provide itself a direction connection with the O&LC.  To do so required bridging the gap between Rouses Point, New York and Burlington, which meant incorporating a new company. 

          The railroad leap-frogged the northern islands of Lake Champlain at South Hero, Grand Isle, and North Hero using a marble, rip-rapped causeway to reach Alburgh before briefly crossing the waters again to connect with Rouses Point and the O&LC. 

          The 40 miles of new line were completed in only a year and were consolidated into the Rutland during January of 1901.  Amazingly, this wasn't the final addition to the railroad's system that year.  On June 1st it also picked up the Chatham & Lebanon Valley, part of the fabled "Corkscrew Division." 

          The C&LV, along with the Bennington & Rutland (acquired in February of 1900 this road operated between Rutland and Bennington), gave the Rutland a through route to Chatham, New York.

          System Map (1940)

          Both lines comprised the Chatham Division, a winding, circuitous route complete with 263 curves.  While it provided the Rutland with southern interchange to the NYC it was an operational headache. 

          With these leased lines added to the Rutland's system it had reached its farthest extent, operating just over 400 miles of railroad on a system that looked a bit like an upside-down “L” between Chatham, New York to Alburgh, Vermont with a western extension from Alburgh to Ogdensburgh, New York.

          The railroad’s one major "branch" was its original main line, extending from Rutland southeasterly to Bellows Falls where it connected with the B&M. 

          For all of the fondness and status surrounding the Rutland, particularly by the people of Vermont, the railroad continued to struggle for most of its life the road simply served no major online customers or manufacturing centers (its most notable freight over the years included marble, milk, and lumber).

          It again fell under the control of an outside railroad when the New York Central gained control in 1904, which went on to sell half its interest to the New Haven Railroad in 1911.

          New troubles arose in 1915 when the Panama Canal Act forced the Rutland to divest itself of the Rutland Transit Company, a steamship operation that cost it valuable interchange traffic from Chicago over the Great Lakes.  The years under NYC control arguably witnessed one of the last great periods of prosperity. 

          The Central moved a large amount of bridge traffic over the Rutland to transfer through Ogdensburg and paid for infrastructure and equipment upgrades.  Alas, these good years would not last.  Following the Panama Canal Act the Central dropped much of its interest and control in the railroad.

          A Rutland 40-foot boxcar is seen here within a New York Central train that appears to be at one of the railroad's Boston & Albany terminals during the 1950's.

          Together both it and the New Haven owned 52% of the railroad’s common stock until 1941 when they sold their interest altogether. 

          The 1920s were another time of relatively strong traffic with the rise in lucrative milk shipments and other freight.  However, again, these happy times were short-lived.

          Things took a turn for the worse in 1927 when major flooding in Vermont heavily damaged large sections of the Rutland’s right-of-way (more than half its total mileage!).

          Then, in May of 1938 the railroad entered receivership and was on the verge of total shutdown until the unions agreed to a wage reduction in August that kept the railroad operating. 

          Additionally, state and local governments, as well as the people of Vermont, worked to keep the company operational by donating money (such as the "Save The Rutland Club) and reducing its tax burden (some bills were forgiven altogether).

          One notable means the road implemented to increase tonnage was the launching of "The Whippet," a high-speed, timed freight train which ran the length of the system hauling bridge traffic. 

          A 2-8-0 Consolidation was even painted black and silver to advertise the service along with print media making potential customers aware of the program. 

          It largely worked, and the company also picked up some less-than-carload freight in the process, although the train lost its name with the start of World War II. 

          After the war the Rutland was in trouble again (having already reorganized in November of 1950 to become the Rutland Railway, bringing a new logo and image, "The Green Mountain Gateway"), this time with a strike as the railroad’s organized workers would not comply with a new change in operational practices. 

          New management, led by Gardner Caverly after 1954, did everything they could to reduce losses and pull the company out of its perennial red ink. 

          A famous Rutland company photo featuring RS3 #207 pulling new 40-foot boxcars over the Cuttingsville Bridge during the early 1950s. Jim Shaughnessy photo.

          Some of these efforts included:

          • Scrapping the entire steam fleet (58 locomotives in all, including its four new 4-8-2s purchased in 1946) for fifteen new diesel road-switchers from Alco (RS1s and RS3s) in 1951-1952
          • Abandoning the Chatham Branch in 1953 (57 miles in all).
          • Cutting the workforce from nearly 1,200 employees to just 400.
          • Purchasing several hundred new freight cars from Pullman-Standard allowing it to scrap its tired fleet of rolling stock (a lot of which would be accepted by interchange partners).  

          The strike came down on June 26, 1953, first in the company's long history, and ultimately led to the cessation of all passenger operations. 

          After 21 days management and labor were able to reach an agreement and the railroad to resume all operations, sans the money-losing passenger trains. 

          Unfortunately, all efforts to streamline operations could not curb the growing loss of its freight traffic. 

          The once lucrative milk trains had all but disappeared (taken away by trucks) and it was becoming increasingly difficult for management to find ways in keeping the company even marginally profitable. 

          By the mid-1950s there were about 331 miles left of the original system and good management had allowed for one final brief period of relatively good years late during the decade.  However, as the 1960s dawned its ghosts returned to doom the company. 

          As traffic continued to slide away a point was reached whereby the company had little place else to trim its losses except to the work rules, and Rutland's remaining employees were already receiving pay below the national average.

          A little 0-6-0 switcher goes for a spin on the turntable at Bellows Falls, Vermont in 1951.

          To help ease the losses and improve efficiency new company president William Ginsburg proposed reducing its subdivisions from three to only two, allowing trains to operate further and faster. 

          The old operations had long called for trains to operate between either Bellows Falls-Rutland or Bennington-Rutland, Alburgh-Rutland, and Alburgh-Ogdensburg. 

          The new divisions would have trains meet at Burlington and run north or south from that point. 

          This issue, naturally, was not satisfactory to the unions and this time they would not relent, walking out on September 15, 1960.  A cooling off period was invoked for a year but this did nothing to relieve the stalemate. 

          As Mr. Shaughnessy notes in his book part of the issue was in regards to the Rutland's now younger workforce, many of whom were not around during the struggles to keep the company operational during the 1930s and earlier. 

          Many from the older generation, who had often been willing (certainly with some consternation) to take pay cuts for the greater good, had since retired.

          Diesel Locomotive Roster

          American Locomotive Company

          Model Type Road Number Date Built Quantity
          RS1400-40519516
          RS3200-2081951-19529

          Model Type Road Number Date Built Quantity
          70-Tonner50019511

          Steam Locomotive Roster (Post 1913)

          Class Type Wheel Arrangement
          B-2/a/b/c, B-3, B-9Switcher0-6-0
          C-25, C-28, C-29, C-2, C-XAmerican4-4-0
          E-1-d, E-14, E-17Mogul2-6-0
          F-2 Through F-12 (Various)Ten-Wheeler4-6-0
          G-14, G-34a/b/c/dConsolidation2-8-0
          H-6aMikado2-8-2
          K-1, K-2Pacific4-6-2
          L-1Mountain4-8-2
          U-3Switcher0-8-0

          For nearly two years after the cooling off period had not brought about an agreement, the property sat dormant as rails rusted over and Mother Nature reclaimed what was rightfully hers. 

          This time, nothing or no one could save the Rutland and the Interstate Commerce Commission ruled for total abandonment on January 29th, 1963.  Even after this time the battle continued as union's fought to appeal the ruling and keep the company operational. 

          These efforts ultimately failed but in an ironic twist of fate, it was announced during mid-June of 1963 that the unions and company had reached an agreement, albeit far too late to the save the Rutland. 

          Thankfully, in a proactive move during August of 1963 Vermont purchased the former property from Bennington to Burlington as well as part of the Bellows Falls line creating today's Vermont Railway. 

          Rutland 4-6-2 #84 (K-2) appears to be moving slowly in reverse, perhaps heading towards its train, at the station in Rutland, Vermont in 1951. The railroad's three K-2's were all retired by 1953. Ralph Phillips photo.

          The rest, including the entirety of the O&LC as well as the Burlington-Alburgh extension across the lake, was abandoned. Following the shutdown of the Rutland in it was resurrected just a few years later in 1964.

          That year F. Nelson Blount created the Green Mountain Railroad. Using a forest green and yellow livery inspired directly from the Rutland (it’s virtually identical) the Green Mountain was started by Mr. Blount to operate his collection of steam locomotives.

          While Mr. Blount passed away a few years after creating his new tourist railroad (which eventually became part of the National Park Service’s Steamtown, USA located in Scranton, Pennsylvania) the Green Mountain Railroad lived on and split off as its own operation.

          Today, the railroad hauls both passengers and has been widely acclaimed as the top tourist railroad in New England with its spectacular views of Vermont's Green Mountain Range and on board train services.


          About The Forest Apartments

          The Forest Apartments are conveniently located to Universities, Downtown Pittsburgh and public transportation. The 3-story, garden-style buildings are all brick and cement in construction. Enjoy a quiet morning sipping coffee on your private balcony or patio. The Forest provides hassle-free living with on-site staff who take care of all the snow removal and maintenance. The spacious floor plans have natural light and boast ample closet space plus additional storage rooms. Call us today to schedule an appointment and make our beautiful community your home! The Forest is located in Swissvale PA. Other cities and neighborhoods include Turtle Creek, Elizabeth, North Versailles, Murrysville, White Oak, Greensburg, Forest Hills, Wilkinsburg, Monroeville, McKeesport, Trafford, Irwin, Delmont, Penn Hills and Holiday Park. Drive to Downtown Pittsburgh and enjoy restaurants and shopping in Squirrel Hill, Shadyside, Oakland, The Waterfront, Homestead, Carson Street, Southside Flats and the Cultural District of Pittsburgh. Take in a Ball game at PNC Park, Heinz Field or Console Energy Center. Center Grove is in close proximity to UPMC in Monroeville, Forbes Hospital and Excela Health Medical Facilities. We are close to CCAC, Penn State and Triangle Tech. Call Today to learn more..

          The Forest Apartments is an apartment located in Allegheny County, the 15218 ZIP Code, and the Woodland Hills School District attendance zone.


          N.J. snowfall totals: Which towns got the most snow?

          The second major coastal storm to hit New Jersey in six days ramped up in intensity Wednesday afternoon and was dumping snow at a rapid rate in parts of the state into the night. By the time the storm was over, it bombarded some counties with as much as 2 feet of snow.

          Here's a look at the final snowfall totals reported by the National Weather Service offices in Mount Holly and Upton, N.Y., as well as the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail & Snow Network, based at Rutgers University.

          Morris County turned out to be in the bull's eye of this storm, with six towns or sections of towns getting pounded by 2 feet or more of snow: Montville, with 26.8 inches on the ground, Morris Plains, with 26.0 inches, Butler, with 25.5 inches, Kinnelon, with 25.0 inches, Pine Brook, with 24.5 inches, and Green Pond, with 24.0 inches, according to the weather service.

          Also buried under a lot of snow were Oakland and Franklin Lakes in Bergen County, which measured 26 inches and 24 inches, respectively, and North Caldwell in Essex County, which measured 23 inches of snow on the ground.

          Forecasters had predicted the storm would dump as much as 18 to 24 inches of snow in parts of northern and western New Jersey before winding down by midnight. It appears their forecast was right on the mark.


          Catham and Lebanon Valley 4-4-0 #5 - History

          This application allows the quick viewing of National Weather Service (NWS) issued Local Storm Reports (LSR). These LSRs are issued by local NWS forecast offices for their area of responsibility.

          To use this application, select the NWS forecast office(s) of choice and then a time duration you are interested in. Times presented on this application are in the timezone of your local computer.

          After selecting a time period and office(s), this application will automatically generate a listing of any available LSR reports and also generate a listing of Storm Based Warnings (SBW)s valid for some portion of the period of interest. You can switch between these data listings by click on the tabs found just above this text.

          The map interface on the right hand side visually presents these LSRs and SBWSs. Clicking on the icon or polygon, highlights the corresponding data in the two tables.

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          /lsr/#WFO,WFO2/-SECONDS : again, you can list none or multiple WFO IDs. You can then specify a number of seconds from now into the past. For example, /lsr/#LWX/-86400 would produce LSRs from LWX for the past day (86400 seconds).

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          New Lebanon, New York

            • 2,182 94.7% White alone
            • 49 2.1% Hispanic
            • 28 1.2% Black alone
            • 22 1.0% Two or more races
            • 21 0.9% Asian alone
            • 3 0.1% American Indian alone
            Recent articles from our blog. Our writers, many of them Ph.D. graduates or candidates, create easy-to-read articles on a wide variety of topics.

            Latest news from New Lebanon, NY collected exclusively by city-data.com from local newspapers, TV, and radio stations

            Ancestries: German (19.8%), Irish (19.2%), English (16.9%), Italian (12.4%), French (9.3%), Dutch (5.9%).

            Current Local Time: EST time zone

            Land area: 35.9 square miles.

            Population density: 64 people per square mile (very low).

            104 residents are foreign born (3.0% Europe, 0.7% Latin America).

            Nearest city with pop. 50,000+: Albany, NY (21.8 miles , pop. 95,658).

            Nearest city with pop. 200,000+: Bronx, NY (114.2 miles , pop. 1,332,650).

            Latitude: 42.47 N, Longitude: 73.44 W

            Single-family new house construction building permits:

            • 1997: 7 buildings, average cost: $89,100
            • 1998: 7 buildings, average cost: $113,300
            • 1999: 11 buildings, average cost: $107,400
            • 2000: 9 buildings, average cost: $122,100
            • 2001: 7 buildings, average cost: $122,100
            • 2002: 9 buildings, average cost: $122,100
            • 2003: 15 buildings, average cost: $129,800
            • 2004: 12 buildings, average cost: $175,800
            • 2005: 5 buildings, average cost: $172,000
            • 2006: 8 buildings, average cost: $218,400
            • 2007: 7 buildings, average cost: $148,600
            • 2008: 3 buildings, average cost: $90,700
            • 2009: 4 buildings, average cost: $125,000
            • 2010: 3 buildings, average cost: $166,700
            • 2011: 1 building, cost: $150,000
            • 2012: 1 building, cost: $150,000
            • 2013: 2 buildings, average cost: $32,500
            • 2014: 6 buildings, average cost: $85,800
            • 2015: 6 buildings, average cost: $85,800
            • 2017: 3 buildings, average cost: $170,000
            • 2018: 3 buildings, average cost: $170,000
            • 2019: 5 buildings, average cost: $191,600

            • Educational services (16.5%)
            • Health care (9.6%)
            • Public administration (7.0%)
            • Construction (6.3%)
            • Professional, scientific, technical services (5.9%)
            • Accommodation & food services (4.8%)
            • Arts, entertainment, recreation (3.8%)
            • Educational services (11.5%)
            • Construction (11.1%)
            • Public administration (7.9%)
            • Health care (4.6%)
            • Professional, scientific, technical services (4.3%)
            • Truck transportation (4.1%)
            • Repair & maintenance (3.4%)
            • Educational services (21.7%)
            • Health care (14.8%)
            • Professional, scientific, technical services (7.6%)
            • Accommodation & food services (6.3%)
            • Public administration (6.1%)
            • Social assistance (4.8%)
            • Finance & insurance (4.6%)
            • Preschool, kindergarten, elementary, and middle school teachers (5.0%)
            • Other management occupations, except farmers and farm managers (3.9%)
            • Other sales and related occupations, including supervisors (3.6%)
            • Other production occupations, including supervisors (3.5%)
            • Other office and administrative support workers, including supervisors (3.4%)
            • Secretaries and administrative assistants (3.3%)
            • Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations (3.2%)
            • Vehicle and mobile equipment mechanics, installers, and repairers (5.1%)
            • Other production occupations, including supervisors (5.1%)
            • Electrical equipment mechanics and other installation, maintenance, and repair workers, including supervisors (4.6%)
            • Other sales and related occupations, including supervisors (4.4%)
            • Driver/sales workers and truck drivers (4.4%)
            • Retail sales workers, except cashiers (4.1%)
            • Metal workers and plastic workers (3.6%)
            • Preschool, kindergarten, elementary, and middle school teachers (6.8%)
            • Secretaries and administrative assistants (6.6%)
            • Registered nurses (5.8%)
            • Other office and administrative support workers, including supervisors (5.6%)
            • Other management occupations, except farmers and farm managers (4.9%)
            • Counselors, social workers, and other community and social service specialists (3.6%)
            • Other teachers, instructors, education, training, and library occupations (3.6%)

            Average climate in New Lebanon, New York

            Based on data reported by over 4,000 weather stations


            Air Quality Index (AQI) level in 2018 was 71.9. This is about average.


            Carbon Monoxide (CO) [ppm] level in 2018 was 0.215. This is better than average. Closest monitor was 11.2 miles away from the city center.


            Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) [ppb] level in 2018 was 0.0698. This is significantly better than average. Closest monitor was 10.4 miles away from the city center.


            Ozone [ppb] level in 2018 was 27.8. This is about average. Closest monitor was 10.4 miles away from the city center.


            Particulate Matter (PM2.5) [µg/m 3 ] level in 2018 was 7.36. This is about average. Closest monitor was 9.7 miles away from the city center.

            Tornado activity:

            New Lebanon-area historical tornado activity is above New York state average. It is 25% smaller than the overall U.S. average.

            On 8/28/1973, a category F4 (max. wind speeds 207-260 mph) tornado 3.4 miles away from the New Lebanon town center killed 4 people and injured 36 people and caused between $5,000,000 and $50,000,000 in damages.

            On 5/29/1995, a category F4 tornado 18.5 miles away from the town center killed 3 people and injured 24 people and caused between $5,000,000 and $50,000,000 in damages.

            Earthquake activity:

            New Lebanon-area historical earthquake activity is significantly above New York state average. It is 68% smaller than the overall U.S. average.

            On 10/7/1983 at 10:18:46, a magnitude 5.3 (5.1 MB, 5.3 LG, 5.1 ML, Class: Moderate, Intensity: VI - VII) earthquake occurred 112.3 miles away from New Lebanon center
            On 4/20/2002 at 10:50:47, a magnitude 5.3 (5.3 ML, Depth: 3.0 mi) earthquake occurred 142.1 miles away from the city center
            On 4/20/2002 at 10:50:47, a magnitude 5.2 (5.2 MB, 4.2 MS, 5.2 MW, 5.0 MW) earthquake occurred 140.4 miles away from the city center
            On 1/19/1982 at 00:14:42, a magnitude 4.7 (4.5 MB, 4.7 MD, 4.5 LG, Class: Light, Intensity: IV - V) earthquake occurred 117.5 miles away from the city center
            On 10/16/2012 at 23:12:25, a magnitude 4.7 (4.7 ML, Depth: 10.0 mi) earthquake occurred 161.2 miles away from New Lebanon center
            On 6/17/1991 at 08:53:16, a magnitude 4.1 (4.0 MB, 4.0 LG, Depth: 3.1 mi) earthquake occurred 63.9 miles away from the city center
            Magnitude types: regional Lg-wave magnitude (LG), body-wave magnitude (MB), duration magnitude (MD), local magnitude (ML), surface-wave magnitude (MS), moment magnitude (MW)

            Natural disasters:

            The number of natural disasters in Columbia County (22) is greater than the US average (15).
            Major Disasters (Presidential) Declared: 12
            Emergencies Declared: 9

            Causes of natural disasters: Storms: 7, Floods: 6, Hurricanes: 4, Winter Storms: 4, Snowstorms: 3, Blizzards: 2, Power Outage: 1, Tornado: 1, Other: 2 (Note: some incidents may be assigned to more than one category).

            Hospitals and medical centers near New Lebanon:

            • SPRINGSIDE REHABILITATION AND SKILLED CARE CENTER (Nursing Home, about 8 miles away PITTSFIELD, MA)
            • BERKSHIRE VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION (Home Health Center, about 9 miles away PITTSFIELD, MA)
            • HILLCREST HOSPITAL (Hospital, about 9 miles away PITTSFIELD, MA)
            • HILLCREST COMMONS NURSING AND REHABILITATION CENTER (Nursing Home, about 9 miles away PITTSFIELD, MA)
            • CENTER FOR OPTIMUM CARE-BERKSHIRE (Nursing Home, about 9 miles away PITTSFIELD, MA)
            • HOSPICE OF THE BERKSHIRES, INC (Hospital, about 10 miles away PITTSFIELD, MA)
            • BERKSHIRE PLACE (Nursing Home, about 10 miles away PITTSFIELD, MA)

            Amtrak stations near New Lebanon:

            • 10 miles: PITTSFIELD (DEPOT ST. BTW NORTH & CENTER STS.) . Services: enclosed waiting area, public payphones, free short-term parking, free long-term parking, taxi stand, intercity bus service, public transit connection.
            • 20 miles: ALBANY-RENSSELAER (RENSSELAER, 555 EAST ST.) . Services: ticket office, partially wheelchair accessible, enclosed waiting area, public restrooms, public payphones, snack bar, ATM, free short-term parking, free long-term parking, call for car rental service, taxi stand, public transit connection.

            Colleges/universities with over 2000 students nearest to New Lebanon:

            • Hudson Valley Community College (about 21 miles Troy, NY Full-time enrollment: 9,346)
            • Williams College (about 21 miles Williamstown, MA FT enrollment: 2,141)
            • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (about 22 miles Troy, NY FT enrollment: 6,940)
            • The Sage Colleges (about 23 miles Troy, NY FT enrollment: 2,499)
            • The College of Saint Rose (about 23 miles Albany, NY FT enrollment: 4,085)
            • Siena College (about 24 miles Loudonville, NY FT enrollment: 3,153)
            • SUNY at Albany (about 25 miles Albany, NY FT enrollment: 15,490)

            Public high school in New Lebanon:

            Private high school in New Lebanon:

            Public elementary/middle school in New Lebanon:

            Private elementary/middle school in New Lebanon:

            Library in New Lebanon:

            • NEW LEBANON LIBRARY (Operating income: $151,834 Location: 550 ROUTE 20 17,061 books 213 e-books 693 audio materials 2,107 video materials 14 state licensed databases 8 other licensed databases 37 print serial subscriptions)

            Points of interest:

            Notable locations in New Lebanon: Lebanon Valley Speedway (A) , New Lebanon Library (B) . Display/hide their locations on the map

            Church in New Lebanon: New Lebanon Congregational Church (A) . Display/hide its location on the map

            Cemeteries: Immaculate Conception Cemetery (1) , Mott Cemetery (2) , Cornwall-Tilden Cemetery (3) , Cemetery of the Evergreens (4) . Display/hide their locations on the map

            Lakes and swamps: Beaver Pond (A) , Shaker Swamp (B) . Display/hide their locations on the map

            Streams, rivers, and creeks: Wyomanock Creek (A) , Hollow Brook (B) . Display/hide their locations on the map

            Park in New Lebanon: Shafford Memorial Park (1) . Display/hide its location on the map

            Birthplace of: George Henry Williams - Lawyer, Phineas Hitchcock - Politician.

            Columbia County has a predicted average indoor radon screening level greater than 4 pCi/L (pico curies per liter) - Highest Potential


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            • Snowfall Past 24hrs

            A major winter storm affected the mid-Atlantic on December 16 and 17, 2020. Developing low pressure along the coast brought a surge of moisture into the region, causing precipitation to begin on the afternoon of December 16. Strong high pressure over southern Canada helped lock in cold air over much of the area. However, the low pressure area&rsquos track close to the coastline combined with the warm marine influence of the ocean also brought warmer air into the region. This created a multi-faceted storm with various precipitation types. While rain dominated along the coast, most locations experienced a mix of snow, sleet, and/or freezing rain with heavy precipitation at times during the evening and overnight of the 16th. Snow totals were greatest in the northern and western portions of our area which remained all snow for longer, with widespread amount of 8 to 14 inches reported. Totals decreased to the southeast where snow changed over to sleet and/or rain more quickly. A narrow but persistent corridor of freezing rain also developed mainly over northern New Castle County, DE and southern Philadelphia County, PA. This brought over one quarter inch of glaze ice to some locations. Strong wind gusts also occurred due to a strong pressure gradient between the nearby low pressure and the area of high pressure to the north. Winds were especially strong near the coast where gusts reached 50 to 60 mph. Minor to locally moderate coastal flooding affected oceanfront locations for two high tide cycles. Thankfully, the timing of the highest tides did not correspond with the time of greatest water level increases, likely sparing the coast from widespread moderate or even major flooding. The storm departed from the region on the morning of the 17th, leaving dry but chilly weather in its wake.

            This page remains a work in progress and will be updated with additional information.


            Watch the video: 4 cylinder race 52221 Lebanon Valley Speedway